The Five Stages of Andrew Brawley

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The Five Stages of Andrew Brawley by Shaun David Hutchinson

Genre– Young Adult

Publishing Date– January 20th, 2015

Publisher– Simon Pulse

Rating– ✮✮✮✮☆

I received a copy of this book in exchanged for a honest review. In no way did the author or publishing company influence my review. For info on my book reviews and rating scale, click here
Andrew Brawley should be dead. Everyone he loved died that night, in the hospital. So there, Andrew, or Drew, stays. He works in the cafeteria, watching the world around him and avoiding the figure he knows of as Death. When Rusty Mchale, a burn victim, is brought in, Drew is drawn to him. Before he know it, his comfortable world at the hospital is shaken, and he yet again meets Death.
Drew was so intriguing! His character was covered in layers of smoke, and one by one we saw his true self as we looked closer. (that sounds super cliche, but that’s how I’m putting it) Rusty was sort of blah. Of course when you’re in the hospital with severe burns, I doubt being interesting is the most important thing in your mind. Trevor and Lexi were really cool. They reminded me a little of Hazel and Gus (no, not just because of the cancer thing) although the roles were switched (Lexi was super positive, like Gus, while Trevor was “a grenade”).
I really liked the writing style, which matched Drew perfectly. Sometimes, things were explained weird, to go along with Drew’s thoughts, and that made it a little difficult to grasp, just for a second. To be honest, I wasn’t a big fan of the Patient F storyline, either. It seemed a bit useless to me. I did, however, really like how religion and the hospital’s Chaplin were worked into the story. It was just done so perfectly.
I loved the way the epilogue was done in the end! It was one of my favorite parts. I also liked the hospital setting. My dad has been in and out of hospitals since I was little, and in a weird way I’ve almost come to like the familiarity of the local one. But I also hate it, because it’s where bad things happen, and Hutchinson caught that perfectly in Drew’s feelings for his temporary home.

I recommend this book to fans of The Fault in Our Stars, and of Laurie Halse Anderson’s novels.

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